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Rookie
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-19-2017
Message 1 of 6 (535 Views)

Sony A6000

Hi,

I hope this is the right board.  I am considering buying the Sony A6000, I hear its a great camera but it seems to get bad reviews on the zoom, or I dont understand.  What does this mean:

 

"Digital Zoom" is just a magnification that the camera does of the image that it sees on its sensor, so it doesn't matter whether it is a zoom lens or prime lens; it is just the camera doing the magnifying internally.

Note, though, that since the camera is just "stretching" the image that it sees, the more it magnifies with digital zoom, the more you will lose resolution. With a zoom lens, the lens itself is delivering a magnified image to the camera's sensor, so there is no loss of resolution.

With a 24-megapixel sensor, you can use a fair bit of digital zoom and still get acceptable-looking results on-screen or as prints, but when you zoom in for instance 2x, that means the camera is cropping in and only looking at 1/2 of the sensor's width and height. That means that only 6 megapixels (1/2 x 1/2 = 1/4 of the sensor's area) is being used to make the full image. You could still get an acceptable 8x10 or A4 size print from that, but it won't be as crisp as what you'd see from a 2x optical zoom that uses the entire sensor.

 

If I get the 16-50mm lense will all my zoomed in shots be lower than 24megapixel or does the above just apply to if you use the special feature that doubles the lense capability?  Does it really turn it into only a 6 megapixel picture?  I have a Nikon point and shoot now and the zoom is pretty good.  Also what does this mean, in zoom: soft cornners from the kit leanse at wide angle.

 

Thanks in advance

Professional
Posts: 1,769
Registered: ‎01-08-2015
Message 2 of 6 (520 Views)

Re: Sony A6000

What's being discussed in the text that you included in your post is the Digital Zoom feature in the A6000, as well as most digital cameras.

 

The 16-50mm lens that comes with the A6000 can provide angles of view ranging from 83° at a focal length of 16mm, to 32° at 50mm. If you need a tighter angle of view than that, you can get a lens with a longer focal length, like Sony's popular 55-210 lens which provides angles of view ranging from 29° at 55mm to 7.67° at 210mm.

 

Getting a lens that can provide the angle of view you need is a much better alternative than using the Digital Zoom feature, which, at best, will give the 16-50 lens an angle of view of 16° while simultaneously decreasing the sharpness of the resulting images (as stated in the text you included.)

 

The 16-50 isn't a bad lens, but it can't do everything. It does provide a useful zoom range for general purpose photography, but it's not very good for other things like sports, wildlife or macro photography, for instance.

So, what do you want to shoot?

¹ The Lens is the Thing
² 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'
³ "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
Rookie
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-19-2017
Message 3 of 6 (505 Views)

Re: Sony A6000

Thank you so much for your reply!  I hike a lot so I take a lot of pictures of things I see on my hikes!  Waterfalls, flowers, beach shots, birds things like that.  I have always just had a slightly better than basic point and shoot because I dont want to carry a ton of stuff.  One trail I hike often has a large Great Blue Herron population and I have captured quite a few good shots of them but I think that has been mostly luck.  I have also captured a few good shots of Bald Eagles high in trees.  When a get a good/lucky shot though I always think, wow this would be really really good with a better camera!  I hear really good things about the A6000 being a good choice for people who dont want, or cant afford, a DLSR and want to keep with something small-ish.

Professional
Posts: 1,769
Registered: ‎01-08-2015
Message 4 of 6 (489 Views)

Re: Sony A6000

[ Edited ]

Unfortunately, while Sony's mirrorless cameras are smaller and lighter than typical dSLRs, their lenses are not. And the more lenses and accessories you carry around with you, the less the advantage of having a smaller, lighter body.

 

In addition, mirrorless bodies are not necessarily cheaper than equivalent dSLRs. What's more, lenses for mirrorless cameras tend to be slightly more expensive than equivalent dSLR lenses, and since dSLRs have been around a lot longer, there's a better selection of dSLR lenses on the used market, which can save you even more money.

 

The 16-50 will do some of what you describe, but if you want to capture a single heron, I suspect that even the 55-210 might not be long enough. (That is, unless the herons in your area are more tame than the ones I try to shoot.)

¹ The Lens is the Thing
² 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'
³ "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
Rookie
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-19-2017
Message 5 of 6 (479 Views)

Re: Sony A6000

Thanks for all the information it really helps.  I will do a little more research..... The GBHs on my local trail are pretty tame-ish, its a really popular trail around a big lake so I think they are used to people.  I find them easy-ish to photograph because they stand in the same place for a long time.   However, I would like to be able to get good pictures of other birds that arent as cooperative! :-)

Professional
Posts: 1,769
Registered: ‎01-08-2015
Message 6 of 6 (463 Views)

Re: Sony A6000

[ Edited ]

We have blue herons and snowy egrets at a large pond near me. There's a boardwalk around the pond and through the surrounding wetlands. While I was on the boardwalk stalking a heron, he stayed under the boardwalk for 15 minutes while I struggled to get a shot of him. He eventually flew to the other side of the pond, so I followed the boardwalk around. When he saw me coming, he flew back to where I first started stalking him. I finally gave up.

¹ The Lens is the Thing
² 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'
³ "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.

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